Wednesday, June 23, 2010

An Aphorism

While a few of us strive to produce handmade idiosyncratic commercially viable foods there is, and will always be, a much larger and better funded cadre of "cooks" who aspire to create families of clones. 
To wit



"Transfer Casings have flavorings and spices adhered to individual transfer sheets or the inside of individual casings — which means no more labor-intensive, messy and hit-or-miss manual spice application. Seasonings can be applied faster and more uniformly with less waste. Uniform spice coverage also reduces leakers, enhances eye appeal and helps maintain a consistent taste. "

5 comments:

Tyrone B, said...

Hey Bob, finally got out of my google reader to come look at your blog and leave a comment, blog looks great! The new look.

When reading your post something inside of me screamed 'your just creating a fancier bologna'--- I for one am someone who doesn't want all his food faster and more uniform...and I can't say I am convinced its less waste. Artisan food creators are usually concerned with using everything and not wasting a bit. That's what sometimes drives a new idea. (like Chris C. with offal)

Keep up the good work at the farm!!!

Tags said...

These folks demonstrate that shovelry is not dead.

Jon in Albany said...

They have a sheet that will evenly apply spices and your logo to a piece of meat. Bob, I can't believe you are not getting these so you can put A Hunger Artist logo on everything you sell at the farm.

Strange that there isn't any mention of what the spices were on the sheets. Perhaps they are custom orders. No matter how you sell it, it is a strange product.

cook eat FRET said...

very strange... but like not the good strange.

Robert said...

There is always something so wrong about science and profits tied directly to food. I rejected chemical engineering because you could specialize in oil and gas (and I was sick of that given my family background) or industrial food production. I mean, who really wants an engineer calculating how best to produce your cheez?