Thursday, January 21, 2010

We're Gaga for Guts! | The New York Observer

So someone at the New York Observer thinks that offal is something special and that people who cook and eat brains and kidneys are pushing the edge of the envelope. Wow, sometimes I really think that I was born into a world too old too late...


We're Gaga for Guts! | The New York Observer

10 comments:

Jessika said...

Me too apparently, too old too late I mean, and I am much in my 30s with both brain and various other things under my belt. I don't eat much of it anyway. I had calf brain once, it was good although too fat for my taste. I stay away from most of it now but it is more of a mental thing.

Ed Bruske said...

I'm always looking for sources for offal. Where do get sweetbreads anymore now that the French butcher in Georgetown has retired? We get heart and tongue delivered from our local dairy's beef herd. Wish they had kidneys on the menu. And what about all those lambs and pigs? All being turned into dog food I suppose. It's a shame.

Jessika said...

I do wonder why some things are considered such a novelty even though they've been eaten forever (well not forever but almost). It is tradition to take care of an entire animal rather than to let it go to waste.
I use chicken liver to enrich a bolognese but stay away from offal per se. I've had numerous health issues so there's something with me and anatomical structures that just doesn't go together any more, besides meat as such. I have however eaten slowly cooked stuffed pig's heart and a favourite of the household is blood "pudding", fried and served with lingonberry jam (substitute cranberry). There are recipes for pig's feet and cow mule sallad in Germany (maul salat). The latter is very nice. The former is not for me. Neither is tripes, which I ate in Italy.
If I have to I can eat just about anything and sometimes you just don't argue. Only recently did I have haggis. A dish I had many pre-conceived notions about.
Basically we are just spoiled. The food world reinvent the wheel over and over. The rest of us continue eating as we have all along pretty much, with some additions over time.

Bob del Grosso said...

Jessika

Amen to that. And may I add a note of awe over "blood "pudding", fried and served with lingonberry jam?"

That is a brilliant combination. I've never had it, but my chef's gut tells me that it is a classic.

Scotty said...

I grew up on liver and onions, chopped liver, and tongue piled high on rye with a german style mustard. We stuffed chicken neks to for a sausage.

What turned American into such wimps, do you think?

Prosperity?

Bob del Grosso said...

Scotty,
Prosperity for sure, but also shame over eating stuff that is not easy to eat.

Jessika said...

Another word for blood pudding, I realised, is black pudding.

Natalie Sztern said...

My hubby and his bro were just discussing the time their Polish mother (late) served them a meal in which they cleaned the plate and then purposefully told them it was brains
I'm not sure I could ever get around eating stomach lining aka tripe.

Jessika said...

Natalie,
If you haven't tried haggis you should. It is "cooked" in a sheep stomach. As for tripe (in eating the lining which you don't do in haggis), it was the first and only time I had it and never again. And brain, well not that much.

Chojinchef said...

Have always questioned the eating habits of my peers. Having grown up in an Acadian household on foods like Boudin, fresh rabbit or plucking chickens, and the usage of all parts of an animal. Then to compare with peers who were bothered when foods on a plate touched other foods, or bothered by seeing the whole animal before cooking. Did they think chicken grew on the styrofoam trays in the store? Now our children are becoming taste-less when eating the processed junk our society considers normal. Prosperity, no. Lazy indifference, maybe. Problem, certainly.