Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease -- Siri-Tarino et al., 10.3945/ajcn.2009.27725 -- American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Don't be afraid to click this link (below) to an abstract of a study that suggests that there is no relationship between consumption of saturated fat and coronary vascular and heart disease. And please do not take my reiteration as an endorsement of the the study's results. Honestly, I don't know what to think about it.




Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease -- Siri-Tarino et al., 10.3945/ajcn.2009.27725 -- American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

8 comments:

Ed Bruske said...

Check out the commentary from Michael Eades:

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/cardiovascular-disease/saturated-fat-and-heart-disease-studies-old-and-new/

Tags said...

Studies tend to reflect the views of the industry group that sponsors them.

The Bad Yogi said...

Comments on the studies tend to reflect the views of the commenters, not the actual science involved.

Louis said...

I'm currently reading a book called "Good Calories, Bad Calories" where the author goes back in time through scientific papers. He explains that there was never any proof that a high fat diet caused cardiovascular disease.

Sean said...

Louis beat me to the punch on Good Calories, Bad Calories. Good book, very sciencey, which is probably the reason it did not sell as well as expected.

That book is an expansion of several articles in Science (which requires a subscription) and one in the NY Times "What if it was all a big fat lie"

There are also some videos of the author, Gary Taubes, available online.

Sean said...

Here is the article I mentioned: http://people.bu.edu/sobieraj/nutrition/fat_science3_30_01.html

Livert said...

Well since I deal with meta-analyses quite frequently, thought I'd give it a read. It relies upon data from 21 prospsective studies that connect diet (reported by diet logs, reports, interviews to CVD outcomes such as heart attacks, death, etc.) Their outcome is relative risk -- that additional risk of keeling over if you eat sat fats. The average relative risk is not different than 1 -- that means that it doesn't seem to have an effect. Meta-analyses are considered the gold standard in medical evidence so you could safely say that it's pretty likely that sat fats aren't that bad.

It was supported by both the National Dairy Council and NIH. I don't consider the sponsorship to be a problem given that the paper analyzes data that has already been collected and published.

Where's the pork belly, I'm hungry after all this writing...

Bob del Grosso said...

Livert
Thanks! That was helpful. Now I can finish my cup of drawn butter without guilt :-)