Thursday, January 21, 2010

Gutting a Mangalitsa

I'm tired so I'll not mince words. This video show Christoph Wisener demonstrating how to disembowel a pig such that all of the internal organs can be harvested for food. Every cut and motion he makes are all aimed at making sure that fecal material does not escape and that each organ emerges from the pig unscathed. It looks a lot easier than it is, although I'm sure if you did it a couple of dozen times it would not be difficult at all.

13 comments:

Keith said...

The last thing I killed - a cockerel - engendered odd feelings in me.

It was a good thing to do, and was done quickly, and with care and efficiency.

During the act itself I was occupied entirely with doing. It was only afterwards, with my hands inside the still warm carcass, separating the innards from the chest cavity, that the fullness of the act as a killing made itself felt. And I was uncomfortable with it....

Thanks for posting this.

I want to have pigs.

Tags said...

Discomfort with killing for your family's nourishment is a luxury, but one that you obviously appreciate, Keith.

So many blindly eat, through no fault of their own, cruelly raised animals with the suffering hidden by propaganda.

Bob, thanks for this excellent video.

Jon in Albany said...

It looks like this was all done in front of the other pigs. Maybe it is just us, but when slaughtering a cow, the other cows never see anything.

Excellent video. Were any of the intestines saved for casings? I haven't done a thorough internet search yet, but I am trying to find out if it is doable the next time we butcher a cow.

Bob del Grosso said...

Jon in Albany
You are correct in that six of the the seven hogs slain were dispatched in view of other pigs. I was uneasy about killing pigs in view of their compadres too, but then when I considered how food animals are usually slain, I stopped worry.

Heath said...

We just killed a bunch of pigs again in the same way. The pigs really don't seem to comprehend what's going on. They don't appear stressed.

This isn't me (or the rest of us out at Mosefund Farm killing pigs) rationalizing things - we don't want any stress damaged meat. If we felt that killing the animals out of view of the pigs would result in less stress, we'd definitely do it - not only for the sake of the pigs - but because Mangalitsa pork is very valuable, and the marginal difference in quality would be worth working for.

Bob del Grosso said...

Heath is right.

The pigs don't even look up when another goes down. It may seem odd but I've seen the same phenomenon with cattle. You can walk into a field where a herd is grazing, shoot one, bleed it and the others will continue to graze in place.

Jessika said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jon in Albany said...

I would have never thought that was the case. I would have assumed rounding them up became impossible.

Tags said...

Familiarity breeds contentment.

If a wolf pack was doing the killing, the others would've surely taken notice.

Jessika said...

I am unsure as to the meaning of familiarity brings contentment, if it refers to comments or to the phenomena of the pigs not scattering realising these being the last precious moments of their piggy lives.

If it is the latter. Domesticated animals have no reason to fear those that they see regularly and depend on for their feeding etc. Any sane wild animal run for their life when you go hunting. Wild bore, recognising humans as a natural enemy would certainly run.

And as a disclaimer.
I am not against meat in any way, shape or form.

Natalie Sztern said...

Nope not watching this one...

Warner (aka ntsc) said...

This is something I do hope to do in the not too distant future.

I do envy you.

paul said...

cool video! a buddy did the workshop last year out here in seattle and said he learned a ton and had some great meals to boot, that's awesome you got to go to this, Bob.