Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Meat for Vegans?




I doubt that a convicted vegetarian will spring for a hot dog made from cultivated meat, but we moved one step closer to meat that does not require animal death with the apparently successful growth of pork muscle tissue from porcine myoblasts.

5 comments:

Heath said...

Vat meat has the potential to eliminate a lot of factory farming. Commodity chicken and pork are so tasteless that the bar is really low for a vat-meat substitute.

If most meat on the market tasted like Mangalitsa, Kobe beef or Sulmtaler, it would be a lot harder for vat meat to replace "real" meat.

We're going to see something along the lines of animal rights activists encouraging us to eat vat meat (or tofu), the same way they encourage people to wear vinyl and polyester (as opposed to leather and furs).

Tags said...

I hope it's not too late to dig up some duck liver myoblasts.

zoey4now said...

If you keep posting pictures like the above, people will wind up adopting them like puppies...u get the cutest piglet pictures and I am still looking for the one with braces in a bigger for my ortho....cause I swear it could be my twin...

Jessika said...

Tags: unfortunately myoblasts doesn't "make" livers, not even when it comes to ducks. You'll have to wait for stem cell research for that one and judging by where the research is you'll be waiting a while. You could take, in theory as they use it here, a duck myoblast and make (a) duck.
I guess that you over time would call this artificial fish/meat/poultry. As it goes now you still need a myoblastic cell to begin with (from the actual animal). Depending on how you define animal growing cells out of cells is how anything is developed.
I'd still be eating a fish in other words, or a pig. It would still be meat. We do need to solve our dependency on proteine for human consumption. Time will tell what method is best used.

Bob del Grosso said...

Jessika

"unfortunately myoblasts doesn't "make" livers, not even when it comes to ducks."

You are too much (in a good way) thanks for this and the rationale that followed.