Thursday, November 19, 2009

It's whats for dinner

I don't often question my eating preferences because I like to think that they are so broad and comprehensive that I don't need to worry if my biases are keeping me from gustatory experiences that might enrich my understanding of human culture. However, there are moments when what is on the plate cause me to wonder if I'm really as broad minded as I like to think I am. This is one of those moments...

6 comments:

Walt said...

Bob,

I don't cook alot of fish, but that one looks just a tad undercooked. My mother taught me not to play with my food, of course my food never played back.

Other cultures often eat things that make us uncomfortable. Certainly our eating habits make others shake their heads as well. Far be it from me to judge what is or is not "normal".

But the laughter and poking in this video has me thinking that this is more a childish act than a cultural norm. Does anyone know if this happens anywhere on a regular basis?

Jessika said...

I've eaten dog meat and god knows whatever came in between. I echo the centiment of cultural differences and approaches to food. Yet, at this point I have abandoned eating things to be able to tell people that gee I ate x (hear the ewwing around me ;) ) and go for things I enjoy.
In south korea you could eat alive baby octopus. I wondered what was the point. But then I did eat dog meat (which was really nice).

Tags said...

Is this any worse than factory farms that prolong animals' lives in interminable misery? At least that poor fish's wretched life is about to end. Laughing at the suffering of defenseless animals may be culturally indicated where these people are, but that would make theirs a culture of psychopaths.

Jessika said...

Tag: No.
And I wasn't referring to the poking and laughing. Just that we are taught what is edible and what is not on a cultural basis.
And I don't believe that people prefer this kind of eating on a whole, culture or not.
I won't compare it but there's this myth going around about kittens in bottles (bonsai kittens). It is a hoax (a wandering myth). Some of these eating practises are more in accordance to that than to anything else.
Although I have seen a goldfish in a drink, eaten barely dead small fish and said no to the san nakji (which is not common to eat as I understand it), without seeing any cultural congruency or general reference to it.

Maybe OT, but I keep wondering why people have kopi luvak. I found it to be a non-event, others love it. Do we drink it because it is good coffee or because the coffee beans went through the digenstion system of a luvak first and that is a cool thing to say that you are drinking?

Natalie Sztern said...

oh my it's a good thing I ordered out for supper tonite...the most basic of all...bbq chicken...

Altho I have heard that the Canadian Eskimos have quite the culinary treats up there...

Caribbean Food Recipes said...

Im not sure if anyone will agree but isnt that a tad bit cruel!! At least let it die before pouring over the sauce!!

Ian
www.EasyCaribbeanShop.com