Saturday, October 3, 2009

Veal Hind Quarter

I cut a lot of veal this past week and I'm going to be cutting a lot next week too. Between the last two weeks of September and the coming week I will have made retail cuts out about 6 animals and the majority of those cuts will have come come from the hind quarters. Here is a slideshow that diagrams the position of the major muscles in a hind quarter of one of the free range veal carcasses that I butchered on Thursday.

I don't usually bone out a whole hindquarter before taking down the muscles into cutlets, roasts, etc. Rather I lift the muscles one by one. However, on Thursday I was a little bored so I boned the whole thing out for fun and, I hope, your edification.

9 comments:

Jennifer S said...

I'm happy to benefit from your boredom, Bob. Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us.

Jessika said...

I second Jennifer.
However. Isn't it easier to de-done it like this? How do you do it (mean) by taking out one muscle at a time? By not taking the hind leg off and work off the full veal meat?

Bob del Grosso said...

Jessika
I usually take each muscle -or in some cases muscle groups- off the bone individually So I don't have to lift and turn the carcass so much.

Bob del Grosso said...

Jessika
I usually take each muscle -or in some cases muscle groups- off the bone individually So I don't have to lift and turn the carcass so much.

IdahoRocks said...

Wow, my ignorance is overwhelming.... I think I need the meat set upon a plastic chart in order to see what sections you are actually cutting..... I do understand the muscle groups as I study what your slides, but when I think of the whole animal, the sections begin to dissipate before my eyes. Does that make sense?

Bob del Grosso said...

IdahoRocks
Sure it makes sense. I had to cut dozens of sides and whole carcasses before I felt like I knew where everything was going to be.

IdahoRocks said...

Keep up the good work, both cutting and reporting! I actually feel guilty that I'm getting a free education on something that takes so much knowledge. Thanks, Bob.

Carrie said...

I appreciate your expertise! I will never be a butcher, but I appreciate the knowledge.

We all have an exit at some point in this life. I'm more worried about quality of life than longevity.

CORK GRAHAM said...

I got so excited about it I thought you said, "venison", not "veal", LOL!