Monday, November 3, 2008

Venison Bombe

I'm calling this salumi a bombe (after the French furniture, not the dessert) because of its bombe-like shape and frankly, having never seen such a thing before, I don't know what else to call it. It's made from two full loins of a deer that was felled on the farm by an arrow. After removing most of the connective tissue I cured them in a mixture of salt, sugar, nitrate, sugar, rosemary and juniper for 10 days.

After the cure, I rinsed them, rolled them in pepper and stuffed them into a Genoa casing (sewn beef guts) for hanging. I figure it'll be ready to eat when it has lost 35-40% of it's weight in water. Because the deer was not killed under inspection this cannot be sold to the public, so if it turns out well, it's going to be on our table later in the year.


10 comments:

redredsteve said...

Sounds lovely. Can't wait to see the finished product. Now, where's Luis to comment on a deer being "felled" the old fashioned way vs going to the local supermaket? Or does he only do that sort of thing on Ruhlman's blog? :P

Andrew said...

Looks great; what kind of drying chamber are you using?

Bob del Grosso said...

Andrew
The drying chamber is a big room full of aging cheese that is more or less controlled for humidity by people who dump buckets of water on the floor when the room is too dry and for temperature by an air conditioner and central heating. To put it honestly, there are very few controls on the drying room. It's a "make-do" situation that will be rectified when we find the cash to build the best context.

Chris said...

Love to know the cure recipe for when I get my entire deer carcass from my stepdad this year...

ntsc said...

I would also be interested in an recipe. Actually any recipe you post I'm willing to make an atempt at.

On your advice this year I bought two fresh hams and as instructed, the butcher left most of the skin on. Right now they are in the freezer, the cure starts right after Thanksgiving and then they hang in the basement until it gets above 60 F. Then one gets cut up and the other goes in a wine cooler under the microwave for a year.

I've also 20 lbs of uncured bacon and 5 lbs of fatback, all with skin on.

MadFud said...

Our family gets the benefit of Arizona elk meat so I'd love to try to do this. However, I had a horrible reaction to a cheap white wine once and was told it was the nitrates in it. I see you mention it in your curing mixture - is it something you could leave out?

Bob del Grosso said...

MadFud
Yes, I could leave out the nitrate but short of cooking the meat with heat or radiation they represent the safest way to make sure that the meat does not become poisoned by toxic anaerobic bacteria. So I use them.

There are other things that can be added that do the same thing as nitrate (e.g. celery, beet and spinach powder) but despite their seemingly benevolent and natural sound names -they all contain naturally occurring nitrate or nitrite.

Jennie/Tikka said...

I was told by a friend at City Hall that we have about 200 head of deer in the hills above where I live. We're not allowed to hunt them around here.

Of course, that's not stopping the mountain lions from having a lovely venison dinner....lucky lions!!

Linda said...

Okay, I have a weird question. So is the drying chamber encased in some sort of stainless steel environment or something else? I ask because I have enclosed buildings that are basically just root cellars, outside cement floor wooden buildings, etc. My husband wanted to try salami in the root cellar, but we occasionally get ants there so that wouldn't work. I'm really interested in this and in all that you're doing on the farm but need to know more about the specific environments, you know, like all the info you provide about your magnificent oven. Thanks!

Bob del Grosso said...

Linda
We hang the meat in a the cheese aging room. The walls are plastic, the floor is concrete. Humidity (which needs to be between 60-80% is regulated (not very effectively) with a humidifier and air conditioner.

Please email me with any more questions. It's faster and easier than this route.