Sunday, October 26, 2008

Freeze a Beer in 2 Seconds

FYI, some potentially useful information. I assume this works because releasing the carbon dioxide dissolved in the beer (which is already below the freezing point of water) raises the freezing point. On the other hand, perhaps the drop in pressure just reduces the entropy (heat) of the beer on the bottom causing it to crystallize.

Anybody?






Freeze A Beer In Two Seconds

18 comments:

TikiPundit said...

Nice demo, but in point of fact that first beer (from which he poured a small sample) was half-frozen. You can see it when he so carefully pours the sample out.

K.T. said...

My completely uninformed speculation is that the release of bubbles provides nucleation sites for ice crystals to form. Compare a blown recipe of hard candy, where a tiny scrap of crystallized sugar falling into the mix can make the whole mess cloud and set up in seconds [and is no fun to clean up, either].

Tags said...

I hear Harry Houdini is preserved in a keg in Detroit.

Bob del Grosso said...

K.T.
I like that explanation, it sounds right.

eastgatesystems@mac.com said...

When you dissolve anything in water, it raises the boiling point and depresses the freezing point. For example, adding salt to water will reduce the freezing point.

The amount of gas you can dissolve in water increases with pressure; that's why carbonated beverages are stored under pressure. As the gas comes out of solution, the freezing point increases.

(Additionally, it's possible that the beer is super-cooled: KT's nucleation theory might not be wrong. If it were a supercooled liquid, though, I'd think you'd need to be very careful when pouring; supercooled candy sugar is much more stable than supercooled water, and as KT says it's pretty tricky. Additionally, some substances give off heat when dissolved in water, and so absorb heat with they precipitate out of solution; I'm not sure what the heat of solution of CO is.)

Kate in the NW said...

and the big question...

why...
would you want....
to freeze a perfectly good, drinkable beer?
DURING THE WORLD SERIES?????

(yeah, yeah, the gee whiz stuff is fun too...it just seems like a mean thing to do to the beer!)

jeff said...

Super-cooled liquid.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DpiUZI_3o8s

Maura said...

why...
would you want....
to freeze a perfectly good, drinkable beer?
DURING THE WORLD SERIES?????


My thoughts exactly, kate in the nw. Has the manly obsession of science beat out the manly love of beer?

The only beer I would consider freezing is a Coors Light (not much of a waste, really), and I think that stuff freezes on its own.

Jamie Barger said...

I'm late to the party, but I'm pretty certain that the freezing beer has nothing to do with carbon dioxide, but rather that the beer is supercooled (as mentioned by others). I've seen the same technique demonstrated for pure water in grad school.

MadFud said...

Flying at high altitudes can also cause a similar effect with hazardous results of wing icing. Just by the impact on the airframe, the supercooled droples instantly form ice crystals. That's why that big impact with the beer bottle escalates the effect in the video.

My grandparents owned an old fashioned soda pop cooler and it would sometimes cause the glass bottles to supercool.

We just loved it when the Orange and Grape Crush would turn this way and we'd have to sit outside in the heat so it would help melt it into a sweet slushy treat!

Deborah Dowd said...

I work with a bunch of physicists and some even drink beer, so I am checking it out with them!

MessyONE said...

Off-topic, I know.....

...but I had to buy puff pastry last week. (I was in a hurry and truthfully, I'm not always successful with it.) The frozen stuff can be pretty good, but I couldn't find it in the usual place, so I asked a staffer if they had some in the back.

He disappeared for a long time, but came back with a box which contained, he proudly said, something BETTER than puff pastry. This was ALL NATURAL, and COMPLETELY HEALTHY.

I looked at the label. It was made with whole grain and soy oil and that's about it. I asked if he'd tried it. He said no. I asked if they'd sold any. He said not.

I told him that he wasn't selling any of that abomination to me, either, and left.

Upon hearing the story, The Boy and The Friend declared that we have to create a new special interest group: People Against Food Desecration. Whaddaya think?

(There's more. Wait until you hear about soy-laced pork sausage and pate.... *shudder*)

Bob del Grosso said...

Messyone

I'm a scratch cook who's knee jerk reaction to made food is to reject it unless someone is starving. Now why I reject it so quickly is complicated. But at base it is because I believe that if I can't figure out how to make it myself or find someone who can teach me then I should leave it alone.

Jennie/Tikka said...

You know, what's interesting is that this doesn't happen with champagne. When you try cool champagne too fast by putting it in the freezer, you don't get cool champagne - you get the entire contents spraying out when you open the bottle in one big boom.

At least, that's what one of my wine instructors said happened to him when he tried it.....

MessyONE said...

Ah, but Bob, there are circumstances....

I found out at 4:00 that we were going to be seven for dinner, not two. Those gorgeous leftover short ribs in the fridge would have to wait a day. No worries.

There was a time when I could deke out the back door, snitch a couple of nice young chickens to roast, duck down to the cold room for some potatoes to mash and hit the salad garden for greens. My mother was perfectly able to get dinner going for 15 people in a couple of hours that way.

We live in Chicago now, though. I had a splendid leg of lamb - in the freezer. I had a wonderful pork rack - in the freezer. I hadn't been to the farmer's market because it was Friday, and the fridge was pretty bare. I was on my way home from the clay studio when I got the call, so I went shopping.

In these situations, the only thing to do is go to the store and see what's there. The chickens were pitiful, I didn't have time for a pork roast and this crowd wouldn't go for the bison burgers on the grill. That left the sausage and lentil thing that's quick and yummy. THAT'S when I discovered that almost all of the pork sausages had, as the third ingredient, soy. Blech.

I got salad stuff, there was a lot of veg at home, and to give the lentils time, I decided to distract the guests with some nibblies like pate, cheese, veggie bits and some little onion tarts. Thats when I found the soy-based pastry-like item.

These things happen, especially in the city. I maintain that we should be able to buy products and ingredients that are nothing more than what they started out to be. Nine bucks a pound for pork-ish soy-laced sausage-like product is an obscenity.

I have no problem spending the money. I'll do it happily. The sad thing is that even when I'm willing to pop for the food, it just isn't there.

Bob del Grosso said...

messyone
9 bucks a pound for pork sausage with plant based additives? Wow, the stuff I make sells for 6 to 7 dollars a pound and is made from pork with whom I had a personal relationship when it was a living thing.

I feel your pain.

MessyONE said...

Bob, you're on! The Boy says that if you'll ship us five pounds of good sausage on dry ice (We get Jeni's ice cream that way), he'll write you a check for whatever you want.

He's serious. I think he's tired of the whining that happens every time I go grocery shopping. Plus, all those phytoestrogens in soy scare him....

Kanani said...

I think this is worthy of an elementary school science project. It's one that as an adult, I could fully support.