Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Welcome Back Trent

Out of respect for the privacy of Trent Hendricks and his family I have not blogged anything about the truly awful events of the previous ten days. Trent is someone who values his privacy a lot, and is someone who seems to only show his face in public when he thinks that there is no alternative but to step up to the plate and be seen. So last Monday when his wife Rachel rushed him to the hospital after he became delirious with fever and pain, I wrote nothing about it.

However, yesterday Trent returned to his farm, and even though he probably should have just flopped into bed, pulled the blankets over his head and turned off the world, he went into his office and sent out a newsletter explaining what happened to him. So now I feel like it's okay to tell you what happened.

A few months ago one of his white quarter horses (I don't know for sure, but it might have been the one in the photo.) kicked him in the shin. The bruise was horrible and the swelling seemed to me to take forever to subside. For a while it looked like he was going to be fine, but then he did something that introduced staphylococcus bacteria into the wound. Over a period of about two weeks, an abscess formed leaking bacteria into his bloodstream. Eventually, the pain was so intense that he actually complained (Dude never complains, never.) and had to be medicated. When Rachel realized that the pain meds she had in the house were not working, she took him to the hospital where he was diagnosed with a life-threatening staph infection.

Anyway, it flips me out to think that Trent almost bought the farm. The man's a dad with five beautiful kids, a fine wife and life partner and a set of parents that anyone would be proud to know -let alone be related to. He's also a great friend to me and a visionary steward of the the land and plants and animals who is really only at the beginning of his tenure. When I think about what might have happened last week, it makes me weak.

Welcome back Trent, we were worried.

12 comments:

Ulla said...

goodness i am sorry to hear about this. glad to see that he is better.
goodness it is hard to get a farmer to the doctor! my father never goes!

Ian Lewis said...

It has been great to find out that he is doing better. It is also a huge reminder to be careful about supposedly healed wounds.

redman said...

Intense story. Beautiful picture, however. Those horses and that plow are something else indeed.

Kevin said...

Bob,
I'm glad Trent's better. I've had two staph infections and it's NASTY stuff.

Crazy Raven Productions said...

Holy crap! All the best healthy wishes to him as he mends. That's scary stuff.

Valerie said...

Hope Trent stays rested for a while, sounds like he needs it. Glad he's OK--staph can be really scary.

boberica said...

Best wishes to Trent and family.
There's a saying that I was told by a Chef whom I have much respect for, goes something like this.
Rest is a weapon, and it's important to keep all your weapons sharp.
Hopefully Trent will give himself plenty.
sincerely, bob

Chef Andrew Little said...

Your commentary about Trent was very well said. Having known Trent for sometime, I concur that he truly is a visionary thinker and we are really only at the beginning of his mass of ideas. Please keep us posted!!!

french tart said...

that truly sucks ass. best wishes to him, and hope he makes a full recovery.

The Foodist said...

all the best to Trent, and heres wishing a safe and quick recovery.

Deborah Dowd said...

What a close call! It is amazing how sometimes something so simple can develop into something that is life-threatening. So glad Trent will be around for you and his family to love and enjoy!

Kanani said...

How awful. Staph infections are indeed deadly. Which is why you should always go to the doctor when you have a major wound. Over the years I've had people who've come into the practice with tea bags, garlic, and all sorts of things on their wounds --only to be sent to the ICU. He's lucky his wife took him in, and in the end --it was her love that pulled him through.