Sunday, December 9, 2007

Bressaola Update

I know that you have all been hanging on the edges of your seats in anticipation of the second stage of bressaloa curing: air drying. So here is a slide show of how those eye rounds look after I took them from the refrigerator yesterday following an 8 day curing period. They will spend the next 2-3 weeks hanging in the cheese room with the other salumi and of course, a few thousand pounds of aging raw milk cheese.

Wish them luck! They've had nothing but fond things to say about you.

12 comments:

Scotty said...

Bob, aside from the ambient conditions in the "cheese room" are you using any extra elements -- fans, etc.?

boberica said...

I'm thinking you would actually achieve an interesting, unique bloom as a result of using the cheese room. Is this a one man project, or are there little helpers involved?

Abulafia said...

Curing in a cheese room. You going for your own unique DOP there.

I remember reading an account of Parma prosciutto makers waxing lyriucal about the effect of the gentle summer wind sweeping down seasoning the ham as they cut.

Seriously.

A cheese room. Cool idea. Tell us about the taste when it's good to go....

Bob del Grosso said...

Scotty
The cheese room is heated, has AC and a humidifier. There seems to be no need for a fan bec the ariflow is excellent due, in part, to the 20 foot ceiling and cutouts in the second floor (it's a two story cheese room).

boberica
Bloom has been a problem. We are getting lots of nice white fungus at 60% rel. humidity (perfect for meat) but when the humidity is set to 70% (which is perfect for cheese) the green and blue stuff goes ape s--t. So we are building a separate room for meat. Trent has an old refrigerator truck box that we've been using as an aging room for carcasses. We're putting in an AC unit, a humidifier and a heater.
With a bit of luck that's where we'll be doing all the air drying of meat.

abulafia
I'm not sure we are going to wait long enough to find out about the meat DOP of the cheese room. The cheese is another story.

boberica said...

Sooo....we're starting to get into the sometimes painful subject of the USDA, or at least the annual health inspection..ugh. Does your work fall under the cheese room inspection, or is it an under the radar thing for now? I find myself hiding the duck prosciutto and kim chee when the inspector is at the front door. Has Marc Buzzio made any inroads for the whole team?

Adriana said...

No casing?

Bob del Grosso said...

Adriana, No, no casing. As long as the aging room is humid, casing is not required.

Adriana said...

Would the same principle apply to a lonzino?

Bob del Grosso said...

adriana, yes, the same applies to lonzino.

Adriana said...

Did you apply any sort of rub to them before hanging? (let me know if I'm pestering with so many questions...)

Adriana said...

Oh, and what temp and humidity does the aging room run at? What would be the ideal range?

Bob del Grosso said...

Hey Adriana, Don't worry, I love these kinds of questions. I love any question whose answer does not pose the risk of having someone accuse me of snobbery or some other negative attribute!

So, no I don't rub the Bresaola after I have rinsed off the cure. I suppose that if you wanted to age it for a very long time (>4 months) it would make good sense to coat it with lard and pepper to keep it from getting too hard but I have not done that yet.
We try to keep the aging room around 60 degrees F and 70% humidity with good air flow at all times. You want the air to move well to prevent mold spores from settling on the meat and germinating.