Tuesday, May 1, 2007

organic ketchup?

Apparently this stuff has been out for a while, but it's appearance on the shelf at a local supermarket was startling enough to me to send me tapping letters into Google. Organic Heinz Ketchup, huh?
I suppose if that Reagan era meme about how as ketchup is made from tomato it should be counted as a vegetable in school lunch program funding calculations, then this product opens the door to potential claims by your local school district that it's serving organic vegetables. No?

What's next? Organic Gatorade? Organic Bacon Bits? The mind reels with consideration...




Heinz Organic Ketchup

19 comments:

Oberst said...

Kellogg's also has a line of organic breakfast cereals.

kristin said...

It is becoming the 'politically correct' of this decade. You can't go ten feet without there being something organic in a grocery store. Get this, right now I am working at
Target, overnight stock. There are ORGANIC kitchen towels. They are made from organically grown cotton and special types of dyes for people who are senstive to that sort of thing. OY! Lets get a grip people!
That is not to say that I haven't tried to raise my veggies without pesticides, and it was a challenge. But there comes a time when you have to give in to chemically induced help for your plants.

Bob del Grosso said...

Kristin -you're killing me with this: organic kitchen towels! OMG.

I do organic gardening too and well, lets just say that I've screwed up enough that my soil will never be certifiable. It is not easy, you bet.

Sorcha said...

Organic long pig!

Sorry, wrong thread. ;)

The Foodist said...

Heinz Organic Ketchup, certified as organic according to the United States Department of Agriculture standards, is made from vine-ripened tomatoes that are 100 percent certified organic, as well as other certified organic and natural ingredients such as organic sugar, spices and onion powder.

The decision to launch organic ketchup was spurred by increasing consumer demand for organic products, with sales of organic condiments alone rising 15 percent in the past year.


Mirrors what Kristin said. Its the new "thing". If we say its organic we will sell more of it!

I really liked:
"is made from vine-ripened tomatoes that are 100 percent certified organic"

As opposed to 56%? damn Im not even 100% organic... lucky ketchup.

Robert said...

Cook's Illustrated did a ketchup taste-test in the July & August 2006 issue. The Heinz Organic ketchup was rated second highest, only losing out to the Hunt's. Interestingly enough, the original Heinz was on the "Recommended with Reservations" list.

kristin said...

Oh yea I forgot the organic bed sheets. Yea no shit, now you too can sleep green! *banging head on computer*

The Foodist said...

Chia-Bed? Mark my words, its coming!

Lou said...

If I'm reading this right, the USDA National Organic Program allows 4 levels of organic labeling:

100% organic (obvious)
organic (at least 95% organic)
made with organic... (at least 70% organic)
some individual ingredients labeled as organic (less than 70% organic)

The first 2 can be labeled certified organic, and use the official USDA Organic seal at the manufacturer's option.

See this helpful brochure. I couldn't read the text in the picture.

kristin said...

Yea foodist I agree it could be coming.Just walk into your local Target/SuperTarget and go to the bedding department or the food isles. It absolutely boggles the mind with how much organic stuff is out there.

The Foodist said...

Kristin- Yeah I agree, but like with all things in pop culture its probably going to get "Worse" before it gets better.

In some ways its great that people are starting to pay attention to what we eat and use, but when it gets so commercialized like it is now.. well it looses its meaning.

Ill be watching for that Chia-bed...

steven said...

I'm a bit late to the party here, but growing cotton is one of the most chemically intensive agricultural processes there is, organic cotton sheets and dish towels may seem a bit twee, but the damgage to the environment from cotton is real.If it can be produced organically at economically feasible levels then we all benefit.

kristin said...

Economically feasible? That has to be code for charge more just because it is organic. Everything I see that is organic anything is twice as much as regular stuff and there is really no difference in the taste, just a price I am not so willing to pay.

rob said...

I think Heinz deserves some credit for introducing this ketchup, regardless of its motives. I'm under no illusion that Heinz gives a damn about sustainable agriculture, per se, but that doesn't mean that organic ketchup (or kitchen towels, for that matter) are not positive developments. On the whole, it's a rather encouraging sign about the growth of the organic marketplace, which no longer exists on the fringes of the economy but now exerts enough to pull to force these corporations to offer such products.

Bob del Grosso said...

I agree with rob and others who see organic ketchup as a positive development.

My post was made in response to something I was thinking at the moment I realized that I was looking at organic ketchup and not to any feeling that such a thing was indicative of anything other than the irony that ketchup, the preferred sauce for so many forms of junk food and so long abused by picky eaters and over-eaters, had now gone green.

kristin said...

It is a positive development, I am just questioning the need for all this other stuff though. Seems like overkill to me.

The Foodist said...

Im going to agree with Kristin on this one. Its fantastic that as a whole the food industry is really standing up and realizing that we need to eat healthier and try to be more aware of our environment.

But unfortantly as with anything that starts to become popular its SOP for all the crackpots and slackers to come out of the woodwork and stick the label on their product.."Organic".

In the end we just need to watch closely what were buying if we really want to buy organic.

If Heinz is for real, then Kudos to them for sure. If not, shame...

Anonymous said...

I know I'm late on commenting on this thread, but one advantage to the organic version of ketchup sodas, jelly etc is you can avoid high fructose corn syrup. The organic versions usually have cane sugar instead of corn syrup and the taste is like it used to be before companies changed over to the the less expensive obesity causing HFCS.

Bob del Grosso said...

Anonymous
Better late than never I suppose and your point is well taken